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From Instagram to Real Life: We Are All Influencers

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I first realized the extent of my influence from an Amazon book listing. I’d discovered a book I thought would be helpful to the readers of my website and followers on social media. It was a great book, and seemed relevant to their needs.

ODB: Words and Actions

The email from the student in my college writing class expressed urgency. It was the end of the semester, and he realized he needed a better grade to participate in sports. What could he do? He had missed some assignments, so I gave him two days to complete those papers and improve his grade. His response: “Thank you. I’ll do it.”Two days—and the deadline—passed, and

ODJ: the big "i"

I recently attended a meeting of leaders that could have become contentious and disastrous. It could have resulted in more fireworks than Chinese New Year! Thankfully, however, difficult issues were addressed with honesty and transparency. The big “I”—integrity—led individuals to speak words of truth, love and forgiveness.
Micah would have been pleased.
Possess

ODB: An Honest Heart

I came across an epitaph on an old gravestone in a cemetery the other day. It read, “J. Holgate: An honest man.”I know nothing of Holgate’s life, but because his marker is unusually ornate, he must have struck it rich. But whatever he accomplished in his lifetime, he’s remembered for just one thing: He was “an honest man.”Diogenes, the Greek philosopher, spent a lifetime in search of h

ODB: Integrity League

We call it the Integrity League, but it’s really just a bunch of guys who get together at lunchtime to play basketball. We call fouls on ourselves, attempt to avoid angry outbursts, and simply try to keep everything fair and enjoyable. We are competitive and we don’t like to lose—but we all agree that integrity and honesty should control the atmosphere.Integrity. Scripture clearly indicates

ODJ: leading integrity

In 2012 a group of experts held a search for 1,000 people of integrity in their country. From that group they identified 20 who they felt could become key governmental leaders. This was in reaction to the widespread dismay over the fact that one-third of the country’s regents and mayors were under investigation for corruption. In a country of hundreds of millions, there was no shortage of leader