Anzac Day

Learn more about Anzac Day and check out Anzac Day’s contributions to YMI over the years.

Posts

Joseph John Booth: A Light of Christ in the Trenches

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Australian Joseph John Booth was that person when he set sail for France more than 100 years ago to serve as an army chaplain in World War 1. Thousands of young able-bodied Australian and New Zealand men also answered the call to serve their country. Unfortunately, thousands of the soldiers never returned home. 
graphic image of Eric Harding Chinner

Anzac Day: Lest We Forget - Eric Harding Chinner

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Would you pack your bags to leave your comfortable home, set sail on a ship that’ll take months to reach a  foreign destination, live in frigid trenches filled with mud that were infested by rats, wear uniforms laced with lice, and fall asleep (if sleep were to come) to the sound of falling bombs filling the night air?  

Lest We Forget: Remembering Anzac Day in the light of Covid-19

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The resilient Anzac spirit is once again tested. This time, warfare is in the shape of a virus, Covid-19. Both Australians and New Zealanders are told to stay indoors (New Zealand is currently in a full-blown lockdown), because this simple act of staying home can help curb the spread of Covid-19.
Lest We Forget inside cover

Lest We Forget: Remembering the Sacrifices of the Anzac Nurses

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The endless procession of stretchers bearing severely wounded men drove home the horrors of the First World War (1914-1918) for Australian nurse Florence Narelle Jessie Hobbes, yet her determination to save and comfort the wounded saw her press on in the face of exhaustion, the lack of food, and an unforgiving climate.
Soldiers in a trench during World War I

Remembering Anzac Day And An Exemplary Army Chaplain

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The call for a “padre” rang out down the line. Some poor “digger” (the colloquial term for an Australian soldier) had died and a chaplain was needed for the burial service.